Region Contacts

Region 1 Office (Former Local 5111)

1291-100th Street
North Battleford, SK S9A 0W4
Phone: 445-6433 
Fax: 446-2405
Email:  cupe5111pres@sasktel.net

 

Region 2 Office (former Local 4777)

215-16th Street West
Prince Albert, SK S6V 3V4
Phone: 922-0600 
Fax: 763-8915 
Email: region2gvp@sasktel.net

 

Region 3 Office (former Local 3967)

1651 Park Street 
Regina, SK S4N 5A2 
Phone: 757-7925 
Fax: 757-6959
Email: cupe5430-r3@sasktel.net

 

Region 4 Office (former Local 5999)

46 – 3rd Street
Weyburn, SK
S4H 0V9
Phone: (306) 842-1559
Fax: (306) 842-1560
Email: 5430region4gvp@sasktel.net

 

Region 5 Office (former Local 4980)

180 A Broadway West
Yorkton, Saskatchewan S3N 1E2
Phone: (306) 783-1396
Fax: (306) 783-1398
Email: renkas4980@sasktel.net

1651 Park Street, Regina, SK S4N 5A2 306-546-2185

 

 

News

Extreme Heat in Facilities

It has come to the Local's attention that many of our members are working in temperature conditions which may be harmful to them. Specifically, we've heard that in several kitchens, our members are working in nearly 40⁰C temperatures. This is unacceptable. We can't accept it as a union and you do not have to accept it as a worker. You have the right to refuse. Here's a link to information on how to refuse unsafe work.

High temperatures are not a joke and are not something to simply be endured during the summer. The Employer continues to have an obligation to provide a safe work environment even when the actual environment is not cooperating. The fact that the air conditioner cannot handle the outdoor heat wave coupled with indoor ovens does not mean you have an obligation to endure an unsafe working environment.

Working in high heat naturally leads to excessive sweating which depletes your body of salt. This causes cramping both in your muscles and your stomach.

Heat exhaustion happens when your body's ability to regulate your temperature fails. The symptoms can include fainting, weak pulse, blurred vision and low blood pressure. Heat exhaustion leads to heat stroke which happens when the body's water and salt stores available for sweating have been used up and it requires emergency medical attention. Heatstroke can kill.

WorkSafe Saskatchewan has developed a document called Hot Conditions Guidelines which includes the following chart:

rest break

Click here to access the entire document which includes much more information about the dangers of working in hot conditions and information for employers about what to do to keep their employees safe.

We know that the Employer has no control over the weather, but the Employer does have control over what they ask you to do when the weather overwhelms their systems. There are things they can do such as: providing longer and more frequent breaks in a cooler space; changing your dress code to include light, loose-fitting, cotton clothing if it's not currently part of your dress code and if it is safe; and, they can change the day's work plan such as changing the menu so ovens don't have to be turned on.

It is not up to you to endure horrible work conditions even when they're partly caused by the weather. Call your Union Office if your workplace is too hot for you to work.

  • Region 1: 306-445-6433 (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
  • Region 2: 306-922-0600 (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
  • Region 3: 306-757-7925 (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
  • Region 4: 306-842-1559 (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
  • Region 5: 306-783-1396 (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
  • Main Office: 306-546-2185 

About CUPE Local 5430

CUPE Local 5430 is the largest health care union in Saskatchewan, representing over 13,600 members. We represent a wide range of health care providers in five major classification areas: clerical, technical, nursing, support and plant operations. Together, we each contribute to the well-being of hospital patients, long-term care residents and home care clients.

Read more